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Tag: title insurance alberta

  • Practical Tips on Drafting Title Insurance Clauses in Alberta

    Practical Tips on Drafting Title Insurance Clauses in Alberta

    When it comes to closing a home in Alberta, on occasion, the seller may offer a credit for the costs to the buyer to purchase a title insurance policy in lieu of the seller providing an up-to-date real property report (RPR). When considering the prospect of drafting title insurance clauses, into your agreement of purchase and sale make sure you understand exactly what you're agreeing to.

    What is Title Insurance

    Title insurance is available for a low premium that is paid only once at the time of the purchase. Title insurance provides coverage for losses arising from survey/RPR related matters including:

    • Forced removal by a governmental authority or an affected neighbour/easement holder of all or part of the existing structures due to encroachments onto adjoining land or onto an easement; and

    • The land being unmarketable, which allows another person to refuse to perform a contract to purchase, lease or make a mortgage loan due to adverse matters that would have been disclosed by an up-to-date survey/RPR.

    Limitations of Title Insurance

    Title insurance does not cover known defects at the time of the purchase. This would include deficiencies disclosed in an RPR or home inspection report obtained prior to closing. However, some title insurers may provide coverage for known issues subject to underwriting approval. If you wish to use title insurance to deal with known issues, the availability and extent of coverage must be confirmed with the insurer prior to offering a title insurance credit to the buyer to compensate for the known issue.

    Do be cautious in drafting title insurance clauses in the purchase agreement. Avoid vague clauses such as:

    • Buyer accepts the RPR as-is with title insurance

    • Title insurance in lieu of RPR

    • Clauses such as these do not address
      • a) who pays for the title insurance; or
      • b) what happens if the RPR shows a known defect which a title insurer will not cover.

    At Deeded, we would be happy to help you draft title insurance clauses and would welcome the opportunity to collaborate with you on the purchase agreement to ensure the best interests of your client.

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  • The Top Real Estate Closing Costs to Consider in Alberta

    The Top Real Estate Closing Costs to Consider in Alberta

    It is too often that we get clients who are closing the purchase or sale of their home in Alberta and are surprised to find out that they did not budget for all their real estate closing costs.

    Nothing is more stressful than finding out you have to scramble to come up with more money for your closing.   Nobody likes surprises.  That’s why we are always aiming to educate our clients and partners early in the home buying or selling process.

    If you are buying or selling a home in Alberta, here are some of the real estate closing costs you may encounter:

    Legal Fees

    In Alberta, you will need a lawyer to close your Real Estate transaction.  Legal fees can range from $800 - $1500 and can sometimes include or exclude disbursements (expenses incurred by the lawyer, which are typically passed on to you such as couriers, search costs or other fees).

    When comparing legal fees, ask for an estimate of total fees you can expect to pay for your closing, including disbursements.

    At Deeded, we offer a flat fee for closings and you can calculate your full real estate closing costs on our website. 

    Adjustment Fees

    Say you are buying a home, closing in July and the seller has prepaid their full property taxes for the full calendar year.   In this situation, your lawyer “adjusts” the taxes so that you (as the buyer in this example), would owe a pro-rated portion of the expense to the seller.

    Typical adjustments happen for property taxes, condo/strata fees, or any other fees that may have been pre-paid or unpaid by the buyer or seller.

    It is important to always budget for adjustments as they can increase your real estate closing costs.

    Land Titles Fees

    The cost of transferring land title in Alberta is set by the Land Titles Act and charged by the Alberta Land Titles Office.   It is paid for by the purchaser of the property on closing.

    This fee is calculated based on the value of the property and the mortgage funds borrowed and can be several hundreds of dollars.

    We offer a Land Titles calculator, along with calculating any other closing costs on our website.

    Real Property Report (RPR)

    A Real Property Report (RPR) is a legal document that clearly illustrates the location of significant visible improvements relative to property boundaries.  A seller will typically have to obtain an RPR as a condition of their sale.

    The amount of work (and cost) to prepare a Real Property Report varies between properties. Lot size and shape, number of buildings, natural features, age and availability of the property boundary information all affect the cost.

    Estoppel Certificate Fees

    You need this certificate to purchase a strata unit or a condominium in Alberta.  The estoppel certificate typically costs around $200 and shows you if outstanding interest is due from the previous owner, or if there are any unpaid condo contributions or interest that is due.

    Title Insurance

    Title insurance protects you from unknown title defects (title issues that prevent you from having clear ownership of the property).  For example, existing liens against the property’s title , encroachment issues (e.g. a structure on your property needs to be removed because it is on your neighbour’s property), and Title fraud.

    Title insurance is often recommended, but is optional. The cost of a title insurance policy in Alberta can range from $200 and up, depending on the value of your property and could be a worthwhile investment for peace of mind.

    Property Insurance

    If you are borrowing money for your home, your lender will typically require that you have a certain level of insurance coverage on your home and ask for proof of insurance (also known as an insurance binder), prior to closing. Without insurance, a lender will typically not advance the mortgage funds to the lawyer.

    It is a good idea to call your insurance broker and shop around a few weeks prior to closing.

    Finally, it is important to mention that your fees can vary depending on the property, location and situation. Contact the Deeded team and we’d be happy to give you a more accurate estimate.

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